Posted tagged ‘resurrection’

The Priority of Christ’s Second Coming–Notes for a Watch Night New Year’s Eve

January 6, 2018

The apostle Paul’s desire was to be with Jesus not by dying but by the second coming of Jesus. Paul’s cry of “Maranatha!” (1 Cor. 16:22) echoes the closing prayer of Scripture, “Come, Lord Jesus” (Rev. 22:20). “Everyone who looks to the Son and believes in him shall have the lasting life of the age to come , and I will raise them up at the last day” (John 6:40)

In the age of the old covenants, Christ’s people were looking for His first coming. In the new covenant, Christ’s people are looking for His second coming

We individual Christians are often separated from each other now. We don’t even know now many sinners who will be gathered with us one day in the body of Christ. But we know that all who are justified before God by Christ’s death will all be resurrected together when Jesus comes again

Acts 2:23 Though Jesus was handed over according to God’s determined plan and foreknowledge, you used lawless people to nail Jesus to a cross and kill Jesus. 24 God raised Jesus up, ending the pains of death….David says of Him:

I saw the Lord ever before me;
because He is at my right hand,
I will not be shaken.
26 Therefore my heart was glad,
and my tongue rejoiced.
Moreover, my flesh will rest in hope,
27 because You will not leave me in Hades
or allow Your Holy One to see decay.

29 “I can confidently speak to you about the patriarch David. David is both dead and buried, and David’s tomb is with us to this day. 30 Since David was a prophet, David knew that God had sworn an oath to him to seat one of his descendants on his throne. 31 Seeing this in advance, David spoke concerning the resurrection of the Messiah:
He was not left in Hades,
and His flesh did not experience decay.
32 “God has resurrected this Jesus.

Hebrews 11: 39 All these were approved through their faith, but they did not receive what was promised, 40 since God had provided something better for us, so that they would not be made perfect without us.

Hebrews 9: 26 now Christ has some one time, at the end of the ages, for the removal of sin by the sacrifice of Himself. 27 And just as it is appointed for people to die once—and after this, the judgment— 28 so also the Messiah, HAVING BEEN offered ONCE to bear the sins of many, will APPEAR A SECOND TIME, not to bear sin, but to bring salvation to those who are waiting for Him.

Jesus not only came to earth but became incarnate.
When Jesus comes again to earth, He will already be incarnate—is now and forever incarnate.

Is the second coming part of the gospel?
Can you deny the second coming and still believe the gospel?
Can you not know about the second coming and still believe the gospel?

I Corinthians 11:25 after supper He also took the cup and said, “This cup is the new covenant established by My blood.DO THIS, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of Me.” 26 For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, YOU SAY the Lord’s death UNTIL HE COMES

I Corinthians 15: 17 And if Christ has not already been raised, your faith is worthless; you are still in your sins and those who have fallen asleep in Christ have also perished…20 But Christ has already been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who have fallen asleep….each in his own order–Christ, the first fruits. Afterward, at His coming, those who belong to Christ.

Romans 6: 5 Since we have been joined with Him in the likeness of His death,we WILL certainly also be in the likeness of His RESURRECTION.

Romans 6: 8 Since we died with Christ, we believe that we WILL also live with Him,

Romans 8: 11 He who raised Christ from the dead WILL also bring your mortal bodies to life through His Spirit who lives in you.

I John 3:2 We know that when He appears, we will be like Him because we will see Him as He is. 3 And everyone who has this hope in Him purifies himself just as He is pure.

Did Abraham believe a gospel in which the Messiah was coming to earth?

Or did Abraham only believe a promise about some of his children always owning the land?

John 8: 53 Are You greater than our father Abraham who died? Even the prophets died. Who do You pretend to be?” 54 “If I glorify Myself,” Jesus answered, “My glory is nothing. My Father—you say about Him, ‘He is our God’—He is the One who glorifies Me.55 You’ve never known Him, but I know Him. If I were to say I don’t know Him, I would be a liar like you. But I do know Him, and I keep His word. 56 Your father Abraham was overjoyed that he WOULD SEE MY DAY. Abraham saw my day and rejoiced.”

Abraham and Job and David maybe did NOT see the difference between Christ’s first and second coming?

Job 19: 25 But I know my living Redeemer,
and He will stand on the dust at last.
26 Even after my skin has been destroyed,
yet I will see God in[l] my flesh.
27 I will see Him myself;
my eyes will look at Him, and not as a stranger.

Luke 2:27 Guided by the Spirit, Simeon entered the temple complex. When the parents brought in the child Jesus,
Simeon took Jesus up in his arms, praised God, and said:
29 Now, Master, You can dismiss Your slave in PEACE as You promised.

34 Then Simeon blessed them and told His mother Mary: “Indeed, this child is destined to cause the fall and rise of many in Israel and to be a sign that will be opposed– 35 and a SWORD will pierce even you— the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed.”

Every king and politician has opposition, but this King has everybody (all of us) for His enemies—He reveals the thoughts of our hearts
Will Mary also be an enemy of Jesus? Or is the sword for Mary to see all His enemies?

Luke 2: 36 There was also a prophetess, Anna
Hannah, favored one….SHE WAS OF GREAT AGE, a widow for 84 years. She did not leave the temple complex, SERVING God night and day with FASTING AND PRAYERS. 38 At that very moment, she came up and began to THANK GOD and to speak about Him to all who were looking forward to the REDEMPTION OF JERUSALEM

Psalm 2: Why do the nations rebel
and the peoples plot in vain?
2 The kings of the earth take their stand,
and the rulers conspire together
against the Lord and His Anointed One:
3 “Let us tear off their chains
and free ourselves from their restraints.”
4 The One enthroned in heaven laughs;
the Lord ridicules them.
5 Then the Lord speaks to them in His anger
and terrifies them in His wrath:
6 “I have consecrated My King
on Zion, My holy mountain.”

7 I will declare the Lord’s decree:
He said to Me, “You are My Son;
today I have become Your Father.
8 Ask of Me,
and I will make the nations Your inheritance
and the ends of the earth Your possession

Psalm 22 But I am scorned and despised by people.
7 Everyone who sees me mocks me;
they sneer and shake their heads:
8 “He relies on the Lord.
let the Lord rescue him.”
9 You took me from the womb,
making me secure while at my mother’s breast.
10 I was given over to You at birth.
You have been my God from my mother’s womb.
Many bulls open their mouths against me—
lions, mauling and roaring.
14 I am poured out like water,
and all my bones are disjointed;
my heart is like wax,
melting within me.
15 My strength is dried up like baked clay;
my tongue sticks to the roof of my mouth.
You put me into the dust of death.
16 A gang of evildoers has closed in on me;
they pierced my hands and my feet.
17 I can count all my bones;
people look and stare at me.
18 They divided my garments among themselves,
and they cast lots for my clothing.

Psalm 110–This is the declaration of the Lord
to my Lord: “Sit at My right hand
until I make Your enemies Your footstool.”

1. Jesus was not saved from dying, because Jesus did die. 2. Jesus was saved from death after Jesus died. 3. Jesus did not die spiritually. 4. Jesus never needed to be saved after “spiritually dying” 5. Jesus was saved THROUGH death.

Romans 6: 9 because we know that Christ, having been raised FROM THE DEAD, will not die again. Death no longer rules over Him. 10 For in light of the fact that He died, He died to sin once for all

1. Jesus died because of the sins of the elect imputed. 2 Jesus was not saved from having a human body. 3. Jesus was saved from being dead by His bodily resurrection

I Corinthians 15: 23 But each in his own order—Christ first, afterward at His coming those who belong to Christ.

The elect are justified through Christ’s death when God imputes that death to them.

Romans 4:25 died because of our sins, and raised because of our justification

If all the elect were not going to be justified, then Christ would not have been raised, but Romans 4:25 does not prove that all the elect have been justified

http://www.opc.org/os.html?article_id=65

2 Cor. 5:8, in context
1. The hope expressed in the context is that of resurrection (2 Cor. 4:14);
2. The “earthly tent” is our present mortal body (5:1a);
3. The “building from God” , the “lasting house in heaven” (5:1b) is our future resurrection body;
4. The clothing metaphor (2-4) elsewhere is used of the resurrection (1Cor. 15:53-54);
5. The “swallowing up” of the “mortal” by “life” (5) occurs at the resurrection (1Cor. 15:54);
6. It is in anticipation of this hope that we “groan” (2,4 c.f. Rom. 8:22f);
7. Paul’s use of such terms as “naked” (c.f. 1Cor. 15:36-27 with 42 and following) and “unclothed” describe the intermediate state and it is clear from the passage under consideration that Paul does not desire to be in this state (3,4) despite how Paul’s Greek contemporaries thought.

http://kenfortier.com/site/images/dickinson/XXXV%20No%2011.pdf

In 2 Corinthians 5 , Paul does not want “nakedness”. He wants the body from heaven, which is the resurrection body. And Paul’s not going to get that body until Jesus comes again. If Jesus does not come again, if there is no resurrection, then we would all perish.
I Corinthians 15: 17 And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is worthless; you are still in your sins. 18 Therefore, those who have fallen asleep in Christ have also perished

Until the day of Christ’s second coming arrives, dead Christians sleep, which means that they are dead. It does not mean that only their bodies are dead, because their minds are also dead until resurrection. Genesis 2:7 teaches that dust plus breath (life from God) results in a “living soul” ( a living person).

The one thief asked to be remembered (favored) on the last day, in paradise. But Jesus promised him that very day, that the thief would enter the kingdom on that day. It’s not only a matter of “moving the comma” but a matter of remembering where Jesus was when Jesus died that day. Acts 2 clearly tells us that Jesus was in Hades (Sheol, the grave), and so we need to think about what the thief asked and what Jesus answered.

Moses and Elijah were not alive at the Mount of Transfiguration—if they were, then there would be no need for Jesus to come again or for them to be raised from the dead. If Moses and Elijah did not have bodies, how could they be seen by the disciples? Was it a vision, or was it a separate resurrection so that Abraham and Moses do not have to wait for that day with the rest of us? (read Hebrews 11:39-40)

These two old songs are simply not biblical—
When His chosen ones shall gather to their home beyond the skies,
And the roll is called up yonder, I’ll be there”

(The Old Rugged Cross) “Then He’ll call me some day, to my home far away….

Calvin—the conclusion usually drawn is, that believing souls were shut up in an intermediate state or prison, because Christ says that, by his ascension into heaven, the place will be prepared. But the answer is easy. This place is said to be prepared for the day of the resurrection; for by nature mankind are banished from the kingdom of God…. we will not enjoy this great blessing, until he come from heaven the second time. The condition of the fathers after death, therefore, is not here distinguished from ours.

https://www.ccel.org/ccel/calvin/calcom35.iv.i.html

Advertisements

We Stop Sinning When We Die, but That’s It Until Jesus Comes Back Here Again

March 30, 2012

We stop sinning when we die, but we are not resurrected until Jesus comes again. Now Christ is seated in heaven (Acts 2:34; Colossians 3:1; Hebrews 1:13). None of the justified elect are now in heaven. None of the justified elect have ascended to a place from which they never descended. (John 3:13)

Psalm 110:1–”The Lord says to my Lord; Sit at my right hand, until I make your enemies your footstool.” The justified elect do not share God’s throne and do not sit at God’s right hand.

An ascent directly into heaven from death without a resurrection would be Plato’s pagan idea of death as the release of an immortal soul. Gnostics teach going to heaven without resurrection. Some of these gnostics are preterists, but most of them simply do not think straight about the need for the second coming of Christ.

They also hold onto unbiblical ideas about what “soul” is. Since they do not know that the living soul is body plus breath (Genesis 2:7), they tend to think of the “immortal soul” and they cannot deal with reality of Christ the servant pouring out His soul unto death (Isaiah 53). Since they change Christ’s death into “spiritual death”, they also tend to change Christ’s bodily resurrection into “going to heaven.”

Ephesians 1:20 describes God’s mighty power “which He exercised in Christ when He raised Him from the dead and enthroned Him at His right hand in the heavenlies.” See also I Peter 1:21, 3:22; Eph 4:8-10; and I Timothy 3:16

Acts 3:15–”You killed the author of life, but God raised Him from the dead.”

No More Judgment After the Resurrection For the Justified Elect

November 4, 2011

http://www.opc.org/os.html?article_id=65

Paul on Justification and the Final Judgment

J. V. Fesko

In recent years there has been much controversy surrounding the exact
relationship between justification by faith alone and the final judgment. While it is certainly important to establish Paul’s understanding of the law, it seems that few take into account the nature of the final judgment itself. There appears to be an
unchecked assumption regarding the final judgment, namely that the
parousia, resurrection, and final judgment are separate events.

The final judgment is not a separate event on the last day but is part of the single organic event of parousia-resurrection-final judgment. The final judgment is the resurrection.

We see the paradigmatic nature of the resurrection of Christ when Paul calls him “the firstborn from the dead” (Col. 1:18; cf. Rev. 1:5). Christ is, of course, the firstborn of many brothers (Rom. 8:29). The connection between the resurrection of Christ and the church is especially evident when Paul calls Christ “the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep” (1 Cor. 15:20b).

What often receives little attention regarding the resurrection of Christ is its declarative or forensic character. The first place we see the forensic emerge in connection with the resurrection of Christ is in the opening verses of Paul’s epistle to Rome: “Concerning his Son, who was descended from David according to the flesh and was declared to be the Son of God in power according to the Spirit of holiness by his resurrection from the dead, Jesus Christ our Lord” (Rom.1:3-4).

Historically, Reformed interpreters have explained these verses in terms of Christ’s ontological constitution: that Christ was descended from David according to the flesh refers to his humanity, and that he was raised from the dead refers to and is evidence of his deity. But Vos concludes, and rightly so, that, “The resurrection is to Paul
the beginning of a new status of sonship: hence as Jesus derived His
sonship, kata sarka, from the seed of David, He can be said to have derived His divine-sonship-in-power from the resurrection.”

The resurrection is not simply an event but is invested with forensic
significance. We find confirmation of this conclusion in Paul’s first
epistle to Timothy when he writes: “He was manifested in the flesh,
justified in the Spirit, seen by angels, proclaimed among the nations,
believed on in the world, taken up in glory” (1 Tim. 3:16).

In Rom. 4:25 Paul states that Christ was “delivered up for our trespasses and raised for our justification.” Recall that Paul has elsewhere stated that, “If Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile and you are still in your sins” (1 Cor. 15:17). In other words, if Christ remains dead in the tomb, then the powers of sin and death have not been conquered.

Vos explains: “Christ’s resurrection was the de facto declaration of God in regard to his being just. His quickening bears in itself the testimony of his justification.” Once again we see the declarative, connected to the resurrection of Christ.

In Romans 8:23 we read that we, “Who have the firstfruits of the Spirit, groan inwardly as we wait eagerly for adoption as sons, the redemption of our bodies.” Here Paul explicitly relates the forensic category of adoption to the redemption of the body, or the resurrection from the dead (cf. Luke 20:35).

Believers have the “firstfruits of the Spirit,” which is essentially synonymous with the word arrabōn, which Paul uses to describe the indwelling presence of the Holy Spirit as guarantee or pledge of the believer’s future resurrection (2 Cor. 5:5; Eph. 1:4). Romans 8:23 means that we will be declared sons of God by the resurrection of our bodies, when what is sown perishable is raised imperishable (1 Cor. 15:42-44).

Just as Christ was declared to be the son
of God by his resurrection, those who are in Christ will likewise be
declared to be sons of God. When we consider that the wages of sin is death (Rom. 6:23), then those who are raised from the dead are
righteous in the sight of God.

“For in this tent we groan, longing to put on our heavenly dwelling, if indeed by putting it on we may not be found naked” (2 Cor. 5:2-3). Paul does not want to be naked on the day of judgment; to be naked is to be in the state of shame and guilt. The resurrection of the believer, then, is a de facto declaration of righteousness because death has no claim upon those who are righteous (1 Cor. 15:55-57).

In the resurrection there is already wrapped up a judging-process, at least for believers: the raising act in their case, together with the attending change, plainly involves a pronouncement of vindication. The resurrection does more than prepare its object for undergoing the judgment.

The resurrection of the church is not the anticipation of the issue of
judgment, but is de jure the final judgment. As Herman Bavinck writes, “The resurrection of the dead in general, therefore, is primarily a judicial act of God.”

The resurrection is not the penultimate event prior to the final
judgment; the resurrection is the final judgment.

We must correlate the resurrection with the fact that those who place
their faith in Christ have already been raised and seated with him in the heavenly places (Rom. 6:4; Eph. 2:6). Were a person guilty of sin and worthy of condemnation, he would neither be raised with Christ nor seated with him in the heavenly places. We have been raised, of course, according to our inner man. Our outer man is wasting away and awaits the redemption of the body, the resurrection (2 Cor. 4:16-5:5). The resurrection of believers, then, is the visible manifestation of those who are already raised with Christ.

“For the creation waits with eager longing for the revealing of the sons of God” (Rom. 8:19). The revelation of the sons of God occurs, not after the final judgment, but at the resurrection (Rom. 8:23).
The resurrection transformation of believers is something that occurs in an instant: “In a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, andthe dead will be raised imperishable, and we shall be changed” (1 Cor. 15:52). Those who are in Christ are immediately transformed and receive their glorified bodies.

“But at that time your people shall be delivered, everyone whose name shall be found written in the book. And many of those who sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt” (Dan. 12:1b-2).The resurrection is a judgment unto itself, in that as the earth yields up the dead there is already a known separation between the righteous and the condemned.

It is not, resurrection → judgment → glorification but rather
even before the resurrection the status of those who rise from the dead is already known. Once again resurrection is coterminous with glorification for some whereas judgment is coeval with resurrection for others. We find this same pattern in Christ’s teaching on the resurrection: “Do not marvel at this, for an hour is coming when all who are in the tombs will hear his voice and come out, those who have done good to the resurrection of life, and those who have done evil to the resurrection of judgment” (John 5:28-29; cf. Luke 14:14).

Not only have the blessings of the age to come been revealed but so have the curses. Paul echoes the teaching of Christ when he notes that the propagation of the gospel has a twofold effect: salvation and judgment (2 Cor. 2:16-17). “Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe is condemned already, because he has not believed in the name of the only Son of God” (John 3:18).

Jesus already says: “Now is the judgment of this world; now will the ruler of this world be cast out”(John 12:31). “For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth” (Rom. 1:18).

The resurrection is not the penultimate step before the final
judgment but instead is the final judgment in that it visibly reveals what has come with the first advent of Christ: the righteous are instantaneously clothed in immortality, they receive a glorified body, and the wicked are raised but are naked, they are not glorified. God need not utter a word; the condemned status of the wicked is immediately evident as is the justified status of the righteous.

The resurrection transformation is only for those who are in Christ. The condemned are also raised but are not transformed. Given the immediacy of the transformation of the righteous and the non-transformation of the wicked, the resurrection is the final
judgment in that it reveals what has already occurred. The final judgment, therefore, is not a separate event following the
resurrection but rather an aspect of one event of final judgment.

The elect have already passed through the final judgment in the
crucifixion of Christ. Vos writes, “the Apostle made
the act of justification to all intents, so far as the believer is
concerned, a last judgment anticipated.”

Some argue that if there is an “already” of justification, it must
be the verdict in the present, but there must also be a “not yet” of
justification, which entails some sort of judgment either on the basis of or according to works.

On the final day, the verdict that is passed in secret in the
present, is revealed through the resurrection of the outer man. The
resurrection reveals who is righteous. On the final day, when Christ
returns, the righteous are immediately transformed. Without God
uttering a single syllable, the righteous will be able to look around them and know immediately who has been declared righteous and who is wicked. There is no future aspect of justification but rather only the revelation of the verdict through the resurrection.

The justification is “already,” and what remains “not yet” is the revelation of the verdict that has already been passed on the basis of the life, death, and resurrection of Christ. By maintaining the all-important connection between justification and resurrection, we preserve the good news that believers are raised, not because of their own works, but solely because of the works of Christ.

Both the Death and the Resurrection

June 29, 2010

Warnock (Raised with Christ) asks some good questions about the connection between the death and resurrection of Christ, and left me with several texts to keep pondering.

For example, I Peter 1:11 tells us of the Spirit’s prediction of “the sufferings of Christ and the subsequent glories.” I Peter 3:21 speaks of an “appeal for a good conscience, through the resurrection.”

The gospel is not the death without the resurrection, or the resurrection without the death. The good news about one is good news about the other. Warnock quotes Calvin to this effect: “When in scripture death only is mentioned, everything peculiar to the resurrection is at the same time included, and that there is a like synecdoche in the term resurrection.” (Institutes 2:16:13, p 75 in Warnock).

Mr. Warnock does well to give us the Ephesians 4:8 quotation of Psalm 68: 18—“When he ascended on high he led a host of captives, and he gave gifts to men. In saying, He ascended, what does it mean but that he also descended…?” Warnock: “Paul explains that, in the one word ‘ascension’, the descent from heaven is implied.”

But Warnock never quotes or comes to terms with the idea of John 3:13:“ No one has ascended into heaven except he who descended from heaven, the Son of man.” To think about this would jeopardize his traditional assumptions about immortal souls (p243, in his very messy chapter on “our resurrection bodies”.

Death And Righteousness

December 29, 2009

1. I am not convinced that there is an “active obedience” defined as vicarious law-keeping. There is satisfaction to law by means of death.

2.. Even if we disagree about vicarious law-keeping (and I would not fight about “active obedience”), it is a great mistake to not include Christ’s death in Christ’s righteousness.

3. Saying that Christ’s death is included in the righteousness does not demand saying that His death is all the righteousness. Romans 5:9–since we have now been justified by His blood. Romans 5:18 so one act of righteousness leads to justification and life.

4. When we say Christ’s death, we must refer also to Christ’s resurrection. Texts often used to prove vicarious law-keeping mean resurrection. Rom 5:10 “We were reconciled to God by the death of His son, much more, now that we are reconciled, shall we be saved by his life.”

Romans 1:4 “and was declared to be the Son of God in power according to the Spirit of holiness by his resurrection from the dead.”

5. Our future resurrections will themselves be declarations, visible verdicts. We must not be preterists.

6. But none of this, neither my questioning of vicarious law-keeping or the future resurrection, is meant in any way to deny that present justification is not ultimate. We are not on probation, we are not pardoned only, and our justification is not temporary or provisional. Why not? Because the death of Christ has already been imputed to us. And it is enough.